About

Thanks for stopping by our National Trust Places blog.

We care about special places and want to make sure they remain special forever, for everyone.  In this blog, we explore the landscapes, coastline and places we love, consider the issues that threaten their future and discuss how we’re playing our part to protect them.

A sweeping view of Patterdale Valley towards Hartsop from Angle Tarn Pikes, Ullswater, Lake District National Park

A view of Patterdale Valley towards Hartsop from Angle Tarn Pikes, Ullswater, Lake District National Park. ©National Trust Images/John Malley

Our members and supporters are at the heart of that work. There are over 200 million visits to our outdoor places, 62,000 volunteers help look after them and 4.5 million members join together to protect them.  Together, the support we receive from members and donors means we now own and care for 250,000 hectares of countryside and more than one in ten miles of England, Wales and Northern Ireland’s coast.

Our strategy

In March 2015 we launched our new strategy for the next 10 years. In developing ‘Playing Our Part’ we asked ‘what does the nation need from us in the 21st century?’.

Here’s what we’re going to do…

Looking after what we’ve got

Our first and most important duty is to look after the land and buildings we already own.  We take a long-term view of conservation, so that includes measures to deal with the effects of climate change on our places.

Hafod y Llan hydro dam ©National Trust Images/John Millar

Hafod y Llan hydro dam ©John Millar

Millions of people every year visit cultural, heritage and outdoor places.  We already provide warm and welcoming experiences but many people want experiences that also move, teach and inspire.  We will offer inspiring and relevant experiences at all our places.

Stamford Hospital exhibition at Dunham Massey © David Jones

Stamford Hospital exhibition at Dunham Massey ©National Trust Images/David Jones

Restoring a healthy beautiful natural environment

People love the outdoors and benefit from the services it provides.  But the health of the natural environment is compromised by decades of mis-use and is under pressure from climate change.  As the nation’s largest public benefit landowner, we will play our part in finding and promoting solutions.

View to the Mourne Mountains from Murlough National Nature Reserve, County Down, Northern Ireland. ©National Trust Images/Joe Cornish

View to the Mourne Mountains from Murlough National Nature Reserve, County Down, Northern Ireland. ©National Trust Images/Joe Cornish

Looking after the places where people live

The places that matter most are often those closest to home.  People love their local, everyday heritage.  But budget cuts and housing pressures mean local historic buildings and green spaces could be under threat.  We will celebrate local heritage and test what role, if any, the National Trust can play in safeguarding its future.

A family visiting Ham House and Garden, Surrey. ©National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra

A family visiting Ham House and Garden, Surrey. ©National Trust Images/Arnhel de Serra

More details on our strategy are available at http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/strategy/

For more on Our Views, visit our website: http://www.nationaltrust.org.uk/our-views

We want to hear from you!

We’d love to get your views on the topics we write about.  You can share your comments on any of our blog posts and also get in touch via Twitter @NTExtAffairs

Octavia's Orchard, South Bank Centre ©National Trust Images/Jo Castle

Octavia’s Orchard, South Bank Centre ©National Trust Images/Jo Castle

 

3 thoughts on “About

    • Thanks for your comment. We’re really glad you like the blog. If you have any suggestions or there’s anything you’d like to read more about, we’d love to hear from you.

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